Migration

Migrating Access Services from SharePoint Online to On-premises

Microsoft are ending support for Access Services in SharePoint Online from April 2018. This means anyone using Access Services has to make a choice and very soon about what they do as support ends. There are several possible choices:

Option 1: Move back to SharePoint 2016 On-Premises. Note that older SharePoint versions are not supported. This provides similar functionality but means you’re moving from the cloud back to either on-premises or a hosted SharePoint environment.

  • Using Microsoft Access (Desktop), connect to the Access Web App
  • Choose Save As, choose Snapshot to export the App and related data to a local file
  • In SharePoint, go to the App management site and import the App
  • Add the exported App into a SharePoint site in your SP 2016 farm

In addition to deploying back to either an on-premises or hosted SharePoint 2016 farm, there are other options to consider.

Option 2: Converting to SharePoint Lists. This option is really only suitable to relatively simple solutions and you lose much of the functionality Access Web Apps have that lead you to use them in the first place.

Option 3: Convert to PowerApps. This is a redevelopment and is worth considering bearing in mind that there are functionality gaps between the old and new solution that may need to be worked through. Read more here.

Option 4: Convert back to a desktop Access database. The benefits of using a web based solution are lost, but it may be the option of last resort for some.

Further information that is useful for anyone using Access Web Apps can be found in the roadmap.

 

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SharePoint Migration Tool

Microsoft has made Migrating to SharePoint Online a little bit easier by releasing the SharePoint Migration Tool (SPMT). At the time of blogging the current release was version 0.2.75.1, the leading zero is a good clue that it’s definitely still in development and may be missing some of the things you really need. Having said that, it does solve some common migration issues and it does it for free!

Here’s a short list of things the SPMT will do for you:

·       Allows you to copy a folder on your file server to a library in SharePoint

·       If the source folder contains sub-folders it copies them too

·       Retains created and modified dates

·       Retains names of the creator and last modified

·       Does incremental copies

·       Allows setup of multiple source and destinations in a single job

·       Source can be a file server (or local disk) or SharePoint on-premises

SPMT

There are a few short comings to be aware of in the release above:

·       You cannot copy photos on your source server to an image library in SharePoint Online

·       You cannot name a migration job which makes finding the job to rerun later can be hard

·       You cannot schedule a migration job

·       If you close out, you need to run the tool and log in to Office 365 again

I’m sure many of these things will be sorted out soon. Even with these limitations the SPMT is still a very useful tool and will help with some of the basic problems with dragging and dropping files to SharePoint.

Download the SharePoint Migration Tool here:

http://spmtreleasescus.blob.core.windows.net/install/default.htm

 

5 Steps for migrating documents to SharePoint

Migrating Process Oriented Documents

One of the challenges with SharePoint projects is content migration. It can be a daunting task with both technical and human challenges. This post discusses a five step methodology for migrating content from a file server into SharePoint.

This strategy revolves around identifying the documents that will be migrated based on the business value they bring rather than a “big bang” approach.

Experience tells us that once people start working with SharePoint, their idea of how it will work best for them evolves. For this reason, we advocate starting with a pilot content set rather than trying to tackle the entire file server in a weekend.

Step 1: Decide what to migrate

Choosing the documents to migrate first is a key part of this strategy. This needs to be achievable and of value. If the set of documents is large or complex to migrate then issues will be magnified. If the documents are of low value then no one will care.

Business process centric documents are a good place to start. These documents are produced as part of a business process and will (hopefully) be stored in one place on the file server. It is also generally easy to identify who uses the documents. It is also easy to place a value on these documents.

Conversely, choosing to migrate all the documents for a group of users, is going to be difficult. These documents could be high value for the owners, but most other people probably won’t benefit from the migration.

If the document is produced from an external system e.g. an ERP system ask, “Do these documents need to be stored in SharePoint?” If the ERP is the source of truth, then storing a second copy in SharePoint may not be necessary.

Step 2: Define your rules

Not all documents have the same requirements from compliance, legal or business process perspective. Agree on and document your standards:

  1. How long do you need to keep these documents?
  2. What meta-data do you want to record about these documents?
  3. What security requirements do the documents have?
  4. Is versioning necessary and if so how many versions?
  5. Do these documents need approval before publishing?
  6. Who owns these documents?

Your file server will be full of documents but do they all need to be migrated? Think about your business requirements and whether you migrate:

  1. All documents
  2. Documents created in the last X months
  3. Leave existing documents on the file server, but create new ones in SharePoint

Make sure these rules are documented and agreed by your key stakeholders.

As part of this step you may be faced with some decision around organising content in Document Libraries. See our Metadata vs Folders post for more details.

Step 3: Test the theory

Test the system with a small but representative sub-set of the documents. Make any adjustments and test again until the “owners” are happy with the configuration.

Your test should include the following:

  1. Security on the Document Library
  2. Check out/in status – compulsory meta-data can result in documents being checked out when they are uploaded
  3. Other settings including approval, versioning and any workflow.

Step 4: Migration

Now you have defined what it is you will migrate, the migration rules and tested the process, it is time to do it for real.

Before you begin…let your SharePoint Admin know what you are about to do. Bulk copying files can impact other users in SharePoint and consumes space on the SharePoint database servers.

Rather than uploading files one at a time, try using Drag and Drop or Explorer view to transfer files (maximum of 100 documents at a time). Keep in mind the limitations of SharePoint document libraries, by default the limit is 5000 documents in a library or a folder within a library. Folders can be used to increase the number of items in a library however you should consider other factors such as security, navigation and search before using folders.

If you are migrating large volumes of files we recommend using specialist SharePoint migration tools such as SharegateAveDoc Migrator or Metalogix Content Matrix.

Note that upload performance can be slow, especially if the SharePoint server is being accessed across a relatively low speed connection.

Step 5: Review and Repeat

Now that you have completed the migration of your first business processes documents, review the process, make any adjustments and repeat for the next set of documents.

Document migration is labour intensive. Create a roadmap for migration. Break migration tasks into a series of time-boxed sub-tasks will help keep the migration team on task and moving towards the end goal in an organised way.

 Migrating everything else

This is the first blog in our series on document migration. In our next post we will talk about migrating collections of loosely related documents. Following on from this we will cover topics including migrating content between test and production, onsite to the cloud and integrating with other systems.

References:

Uploading Documents in to SharePoint

Contract Management with SharePoint

SharePoint has some great Document Management capabilities out of the box. It is possible to build powerful document centric solutions using out of the box functionality often without using third-party document management extensions.

Here’s a video I put together to show off some of the features. The demo is using SharePoint 2010, but the same functionality is available in SharePoint 2013 and Office 365 SharePoint. I have used Document Sets which aren’t present in SharePoint Foundation (the free version of SharePoint), but all of the other features are present and you can build reasonably sophisticated solutions with Foundation.

Once you have implemented a solution in SharePoint, you’ll need a strategy for migrating documents. I have put together some tips on document migration including a method and tools.

5 Tips for Successful Document Migration into SharePoint

If you like what you see and want to know more, get in touch with me and I’ll send you a free White Paper based on this solution and some tips for building it yourself.

My Contact details are here.