Office 365

Why is Office 365 going slow?

Is your Office 365 running slow at random times? Does it seem to happen at work but be fine from home (or some other location)? Here is a short check list to help diagnose the problem.

Where is your Office 365 Tenant located?

Make sure your tenant is hosted in a location that makes sense. For us New Zealanders, the nearest location is Australia. Check the Office 365 Datacenter map.

Are you behind a Firewall or Proxy Server?

All Office 365 services use SSL. Firewalls and Proxy server with SSL Packet Inspection enabled can be a source of latency, especially if they are under a heavy load. Does turning off packet inspection improve performance? Does the Firewall’s console show high memory or CPU usage? This article ‘Should you use SSL Inspection’ by Forinet is a good read and applies to other vendors too.

Check your international bandwidth

In New Zealand some ISP’s limit the amount of international bandwidth allocated to each customer. If you have a large number of users, this could be a bottleneck. Talk to your ISP about the bandwidth allocation. Some may also have Office 365 specific plans.

Express Route is another technology that can improve performance for Azure and Office 365. See Microsoft’s Express Route partners and peering locations document. Talk to your ISP about Express Route.

Are you connecting across a WAN to your company internet connection?

If you are working from a branch office, then your internet traffic may be passing over a WAN link before getting to the internet. How much bandwidth do you have and are you sharing it with other traffic? Are you slowing down when someone prints a big file?

Other things to check

  • Network switches on your local LAN. Look for packet loss, latency and retry errors
  • Wireless network. Is the issue related to your WiFi only?
  • Your PC (or Mac). Is the problem specific to one device?
  • Run a speed test on your internet connection.
  • Are you over your data cap?

For a details example of how to troubleshoot Office 365 performance, read this article from Microsoft Premier Support.

There are other reasons Office 365 might be running slow, but in my experience most issues relate to the environment users are in. Try to eliminate the easiest things first.

SSIS, InfoPath and SharePoint Lists

Have you ever needed  a low cost solution for capturing data in a form on mobile device and then pull the data back into an in house SQL database. In this solution data is entered into an InfoPath form on a tablet (Windows, iOS or Android), submitted to a SharePoint Online form library and then pulled into a SQLserver database using SQL Integration Services (SSIS).

screen-shot-2017-01-21-at-10-17-01-am

This solution will also work with standard SharePoint lists and can be used with SharePoint Online, SharePoint 2013 or SharePoint 2016.

The things you need to know:

  • InfoPath forms can be hosted in a SharePoint Online forms library
  • InfoPath can ‘promote’ fields from the form into metadata fields in the SharePoint Online forms library e.g. each form will be saved and selected fields will appear as columns on the form library.
  • SharePoint Online form libraries can be queried using an oData connection
  • SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) can use oData as a data source and push or pull data to and from the data source
  • SSIS can be scheduled

Note: SQL Server Standard Edition (or better) includes SSIS

InfoPath steps:

  1. Using InfoPath Designer, create a form and publish the form to a SharePoint Form library. The easiest option is to do this from InfoPath and let it create the Form library for you.
  2. In Form Options, select the fields that you want to ‘promote’ to SharePoint.
  3. Publish the form
  4. In SharePoint verify that the promoted fields are showing as columns in the Forms library

SQL Server and SSIS steps:

In this step we setup a database and SSIS package. The connection is initiated from the server running SSIS and so this server must be able to make an outbound connection to Office 365.

SSIS packages are created using SQL Server Data Tools

  1. Create a table in your database with fields to store the data from the form
  2. Using Visual Studio create an SSIS package
    • Create the  SQLserver data connection for SQL table created in step 1
    • Create the oData connection to the SharePoint Online list. You will need:
      • The URL for the Form library (the site URL)
      • Office 365 credentials with permission to read the list. These credentials will be saved in the SSIS package
      • See the authentication note below
    • Map the fields from the oData Connection to the SQLserver Connection fields
    • Save
  3. Once you have tested the process (see steps below), you can schedule the SSIS package to run on as frequently as you need.

Testing:

  1. Create a new InfoPath form and submit the form to the library
  2. In SharePoint, check to see that the promoted fields are populated
  3. In Visual Studio run the SSIS package (you may need to ‘Run as Administrator’ when you start Visual Studio for this to work
  4. Check the table in SQLserver to see if any new data has arrived

Authentication issue:

When creating the oData connection to Office 365, you must manually change the setting for ‘Microsoft Online Services Authentication’ to true. This is in the oData Connection Manager settings, under Connection in the Security section. More details here.

Resources:

How to promote fields from InfoPath to SharePoint

How to create an SSIS package with SQL Server Data Tools

MSDN: SSIS oData tutorials

Can I use Office 365 on a Mac?

I’ve been watching a little revolution taking place over the past few months. I’ve noticed a few people in my wider circle (human, not Google+) becoming a little bit “Mac-curious”. They’re starting to ask questions like, should I buy a Mac or a PC?

The answer is of course depends on what you want to use the computer for…A few years ago, if the answer was “work” then for 95% of people a PC was the right choice. My own recent experiences seem to make that line a blurry.

Word Online with Safari

In my day to day job, I am a company Director and an IT Consultant working largely with Microsoft Technologies with a major focus on SharePoint and Office 365. Here’s a few things I’d like to share about my experience of working with Office 365 from a Mac.

Using nothing more than a Mac Book Pro (13 inch retina display) and an internet connection at the office, paired to my phone and a variety of Wifi locations including home, airports and cafes, I can get my work done. No hassles, it just works!

I have Office 2011 for Mac installed locally, but actually I hardly need it. The Office Web Apps are great, far better than Google Apps (yep I’ve use them daily too). I love the Excel and Word Web Apps. Pair these two work horses with Outlook Web App and SharePoint and I can do almost everything I need for my day to day work. The experience is the same as if I was on a PC.

I can drag files from my local machine to a SharePoint document library. I can sync files locally using the Mac One Drive client. I can edit without compatibility issues. I can print without wonky formatting. It just works.

Office for Mac includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Lync. It has some limitations so do your homework, particularly if you need VBA or third-party add-on support.

I still have a few little things that work better on a PC, particularly connectivity into a few of my clients, however the Microsoft now providing a great RDS Client for Mac, I hardly ever need to boot into Windows.

I would like to congratulate the folks at Redmond for providing great Mac OSX support. I see this as a real positive for Microsoft as many of their services are now accessible to people using other platforms including iOS and soon Android support for Office. Nice one!